Book Recommendation: “God’s Own Child, I Gladly Say It”

Looking for a great baptism gift for a little one? Have I a book for you!

God’s Own Child, I Gladly Say It illustrated by Jonathan Mayer shows the lifelong gift that baptism provides through the text of the hymn “God’s Own Child, I Gladly Say It.” The book journeys through a boy’s life, from the baptismal font as an infant to the end of his earthly life and start of his eternal life in Heaven. The illustrations are beautiful and engaging and the hymn text is the same that is found in the Lutheran Service Book.

We got this book for Sweet Pea for Christmas. She’s rather indifferent towards it (as she is to most things since she’s only 2 months old), but 2-year-old Babykins loves it. She asks me to sing it 3 or 4 times whenever she pulls out the book. A good bonus to this book is that I’m in the process of memorizing the hymn just from sheer repetition (I find this much more useful to me than memorizing Chicka Chicka Boom Boom). Likewise, my husband used the book while teaching about baptism to his confirmation students. He said that they actually enjoyed having the hymn illustrated so clearly despite them being in 6th and 7th grade and past the age of picture books.

God’s Own Child, I Gladly Say It: Buy it, sing it, enjoy it!

 

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Now Babykins Does Better in Church

babykins in church

What the entire congregation gets to see on Sunday morning. :p

Babykins is a toddler. She does toddler things like move constantly, yell at random times, and destroy things. She does not stop being a toddler when we go to church. Consequently, Sunday mornings can often feel like an exercise in futility as I try to keep her quiet and still during the church service.

However, the last few weeks Babykins has started to surprise me with her behavior in church. She’s gotten a little less loud and a little more interested in watching what is happening the service. So what changed?

1. Sitting up front: Despite past failures, we gave sitting up front another try. I realized that a lot of her antics were attempts to see people and things better (this wasn’t always the reason for her squirming in the past). Plus, we were getting blinded by the morning sun beating through the stained glass window in our pew in the back. So, despite my solid Lutheran upbringing to avoid the front at all costs, Babykins and I now troop up to the second pew on Sunday mornings. She still does toddler activities like yell at random times, walk on the pew, and toss her toys in the pew behind us. Likewise, she still freaks out sometimes because she wants to go to her dad, but we’re learning to deal with that.

2. Letting go of Babywearing: I finally gave up on the ring sling in church. Babykins was making it clear to everyone that she was not happy being confined and the sling wasn’t making it any easier to hold her with all her thrashing around. Some people are able to wear their children in church throughout the toddler years, I am not one of them.

3. More interest in books: Babykins has developed a love for books in recent weeks. This means that she’ll actually look at a book during the sermon, cutting back on her chatter and wiggles. My favorite book to bring with us is My Church Words Book.  This book is printed by Concordia Publishing House, which means that many of the pictures inside are from LC-MS churches. This makes it easier to connect what is happening in the service to the pictures in the book. It’s fun to point to the pictures of things like the hymnal and pew Bible in the book and then point to the actual hymnal and pew Bible.

4. Practicing with a hymnal at home: A couple of weeks ago I was attempting to play some hymns on our piano. It didn’t go very well since Babykins is very insistent that she plays the piano with me. However, during this time I wound up letting her look at my hymnal on the floor. She surprised me with her gentleness with it! No torn pages, very few crinkled corners. Consequently, I decided to let her have a hymnal during church. For the last couple of weeks, she has contentedly flipped through the hymnal throughout the service. She’s not always perfectly gentle with it–I’m seeing a hymnal donation to the church in a couple of years–but she stays quiet!

I’m not expecting Babykins to keep up this behavior indefinitely. Babies and toddlers grow too quickly for any routine to stay around too long. What has worked for us the last couple of weeks may very well not work this coming Sunday. But for now, I’ll enjoy another sweet spot of Sunday mornings.


Babykins’s Favorite Thanksgiving Book

Babykins’s favorite Thanksgiving book is Over the River and Through the WoodsShe loves hearing Lydia Maria Child’s poem sung and observing woodcut illustrations by Christopher Mason. My parents bought her the book last year for her first Thanksgiving. At 2 months old, she didn’t care one bit about it then, but this year she pulls it off the shelf and has me read through it a couple of times per reading session. I highly recommend this book!


Introvert Monday: When Children’s Books Understand Introversion

It’s been awhile since I’ve written an “Introvert Monday” post.  Sorry!

Last week I was reading my youngest nanny charge One, Two, Three! by Sandra Boynton.  Since many of Sandra Boynton’s books weren’t published until after I had outgrown board books, reading her books are new to me.  Consequently, I had no idea that One, Two, Three! understood introversion.  First, the book took us counting up to 10 while looking at illustrations of animals doing funny things like having tea or exploring a cave.  *Spoilers*  But the last few pages went like this:

Ten makes a celebration LOUD, LOUD, LOUD!  And ONE is WONDERFUL after a crowd.

I smiled as I finished the story.  I might be trying to glean too much from a children’s book, but I felt that here was an author encouraging young readers to spend time alone and not to feel like they always have to be having fun in a crowd.  The illustrations also encourage this idea.  On the “Ten” page, nine animals march around with noisy instruments while the tenth animal (a little cat) gives a bug-eyed look to the reader.  On the last “One” page, the same little cat gives a relaxed smile as he stands alone on the page, because one is truly wonderful after a crowd.