Question of the Night

How long does it take before watching the live stream of Call Night before you no longer have a very vivid flashback to your husband’s Call Night? The intense feeling of nervousness was still plenty strong tonight even though we’re 3 years out.

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It’s One of Those Weeks, But That’s Okay

It’s one of those weeks when extra duties for the church and a holiday crash into one another. An elderly church member died Thursday night, so my husband has a funeral service tomorrow afternoon. He also has an extra service this week on Wednesday night for Thanksgiving. We’re traveling a couple of hours on Thanksgiving to visit family. And then Sunday comes again and all the preparations that come with it.

Yes, it’s one of those weeks where my husband is busy at work and thinking about work when he’s at home. It’s one of those weeks where the majority of travel preparations fall on me. It’s one of those weeks were quality time for my husband and me is limited. It’s one of those weeks that the upcoming chaos of Advent and Christmas looms over our heads.

But you know what? This is okay. Not ideal, but okay. We will get through this week. We may be a little more tired than normal and our patience may be a bit short. Our routine may not operate as smoothly as usual. But we will live.

Being able to have this perspective is one of the advantages of being done with my husband’s first year in the ministry. I know now that there are just going to be weeks like this. Most people have them, even if their husbands aren’t pastors. Likewise, I understand that most likely¬†it will be over a month before we can catch up on rest and relaxation, but there will be a quieter time eventually. It may not be when we think it should come and we may have to purposely set aside time, but it will arrive. That is the ebb and flow of our parsonage life.

P.S.–Lest you think I have this whole pastor’s family thing figured out, feel free to check in on my attitude in a few weeks when the craziness of Advent is in full swing. My guess is that I’ll still have a breakdown or two. ūüôā¬†


Advantages of Living in a Parsonage

Parsonage horror stories are passed around¬†during the seminary years. Most of the time you don’t hear them from someone who actually experienced it. In stead, the story usually starts with, “I know of a pastor who lived in a parsonage. . .” and then goes on to tell a terrible tale about a run-down house where every congregation member had a key and the church¬†council¬†would hold their meetings at 5 a.m. in the parsonage’s living room.

Okay, maybe I’m exaggerating a little bit. But many of these parsonage tales convince skittish seminary families that they never, ever want to live in a parsonage.

Thankfully, many seminary families live in homes owned by the church on vicarage. Often these families come out of vicarage having a good experience in their homes. Likewise, the majority of experienced pastor’s families have mostly positive things to say about living in parsonages.

This is the second parsonage my husband and I have lived in (well, technically the house on vicarage wasn’t a parsonage because a pastor never lived there, but it was the same idea). So far we’ve had a good experience living in a parsonage for several reasons:

1. We¬†don’t¬†have to worry about finding housing:¬†Moving for vicarage or a call is generally a whirlwind. With only a couple of months to pack up and move, there is very little time to find housing. If there isn’t a parsonage, either the family has to quickly buy a house with very little knowledge of the area or they have to rent a place knowing that there is another move if they decide to buy a house. Likewise, the pastor’s family doesn’t have to worry about selling a house should he accept a different call.

2. We¬†don’t have to pay for major renovations and repairs:¬†Since the church owns the house, they take on the responsibility of keeping it livable. Admittedly, sometimes this can be a frustration when the pastor’s family is hoping for an immediate repair or change because it takes time to get approval from the right committees. However, when something like the septic system backing up occurs, the church will cover the cost.

Sometimes the church will even pay for an improvement that you weren’t expecting. For example, the dishwasher was a bit aged when we moved into our current parsonage. My husband and I weren’t complaining because we were thrilled to have any mechanical dishwasher after hand-washing dishes for 3 years. However, our trustee decided that the dishwasher wasn’t working well enough and had it replaced. It’s the nicest dishwasher I’ve ever had in my home.

3. We can embrace our home with, “We’ll make it work.”:¬†This may sound like a backhanded compliment, but I promise it’s not. I’m a perfectionist when it comes to shopping–that’s probably why I hate it so much. I’m always convinced that there is a product that is a little bit better quality for a little bit better price and I MUST FIND IT!! That’s why I do things like search 20 minutes¬†on Amazon for the perfect pair of socks¬†for Babykins (Seriously, self, it’s just a pair of socks!). Can you imagine how I would be if I had to buy a house? Be given a house is a relief to my perfectionist tendencies. Instead of searching for the nonexistent perfect house, we can look at our home and say, “There are some great things and not-so-great things. We’ll make it work!”

Credit where credit is due: My sister-in-law, who grew up in teacherages and lived in a parsonage, introduced me to this mentality. ūüôā¬†

4. The members feel a connection to the house: Admittedly, this is a little bit harder fro me to embrace, but congregation members often like being able to care for their pastor in a tangible way. Helping with his home is an easy way for them to do this.

Of course, there are some disadvantages to living in a parsonage, but there are disadvantages to any housing situation. Overall, I would say our experiences with parsonages have been positive and I’m very thankful for the homes our congregations have provided for us.

 


What I’ve Learned in the Last Year

July 6 was my husband’s one-year anniversary of his ordination. Not to sound cliche, but this past year has flown by–it took my by surprise to realized that we are no longer in the first year of his ministry!

1st year

Obviously after only a year, I’m no expert at this whole “Pastor’s Family” thing. However, having gone through the first year has given me some unexpected insights.

1. I often don’t think of myself as a “Pastor’s Wife”.¬†I spent the seminary years taking advice from many pastor’s wives on how to handle this vocation. I was prepared to build my “Pastor’s Wife” persona with whatever congregation called my husband. However, I now realize that I rarely think of myself as a “Pastor’s Wife”. If I were to tell people about myself, I would first say that I’m a wife and mother. I might even mention that I fancy myself something of a writer. But a “Pastor’s Wife”? At most, I might mention that my husband is a pastor.

2. The congregation members let me keep to myself. Again, after spending the seminary years learning about what the life of a pastor’s wife would look like, I was prepared to say no to many church activities. However, the people here mostly leave me alone. There’s been minimal pressure to join the LWML and no one has asked me to do anything like teach Sunday School or head up social events. I’ve been given my space, and I appreciate that.

Of course, having a baby during this first year probably help lessen the pressure. ūüôā

3.¬†It’s hard to adjust to the “forever home” mentality.¬†During the seminary years, I became skilled at not becoming attached to places. Now that we’re not moving this summer, I realize that I still feel like an observer of the church’s and town’s going-ons rather than a member.

4. I’m still not sure what to call my husband when talking to other members.¬†Prior to arriving at my husband’s call, I was very adamant that I would not call him “Pastor”. After all, I wash the man’s clothes, budget his paycheck, and bore his child–I would think that would prove¬†that we have more of a relationship than just Pastor-Member!

However, I didn’t¬†realize¬†that people have a tendency to pick up on what I name I call him¬†and use it in conversations with me. I still don’t refer to him as “Pastor” often, but I have become¬†careful not to call him by his first name in front of members. Usually I call him “my husband” or tell something about “us” or “our family”. There have been instances that I opted not to include part of a story¬†simply because I couldn’t figure out what to call him!

5. Learning to filter the questions I ask my husband is difficult.¬†As a couple, my husband and I desire¬†to share most things about our lives with each other. While I can freely tell my husband everything I do during the day, he cannot. Despite my¬†inclination to ask for details about his daily work–after all, I care about him and what he does–sometimes vague answers are necessary. It’s not my business to know details if he only¬†tells me he is “meeting with someone”. And when he has a bad day, sometimes the only reason he can tell me is “church stuff”. Asking questions puts him in the uncomfortable position of having to tell me I can’t know the details.

Of course, not all parts of his work is taboo. I can certainly ask things like how a Bible study went or if so-and-so is home from the hospital.

6. Trying to balance my husband’s needs and my needs on his day off is still a work in progress.¬†In order to fully relax, my husband prefers to leave town because of the fishbowl issue. However, I’m a homebody and would prefer to stay home and do things around the house. We’re still working on finding a balance.

7. Nothing can fully prepare you for your husband’s call.¬†It doesn’t matter how many pastor’s wives panels you attend or how many pastor’s wife blogs you read, you can’t know how your life will look like¬†before arriving at your husband’s church. There are just too many factors: Your husband’s personality, your disposition, the experiences members have had prior to your arrival, the town’s dynamics, and so on. All you can do is trust that this is where God has called your husband–and consequently, you–and make the best of it.

 

 

 


The Forced Fourth of July

forced of July

 

My husband and I made it safely to Iowa a week ago today. ¬†We’re still trying to make the adjustment to our new life. ¬†There’s been issues with a wet basement, lots of phone calls and texts for my husband as he starts entering his role as Pastor (of course, he isn’t officially a pastor until ordination on Sunday), and just plain exhaustion.

There are some good things that have come with the move as well. ¬†Some of our family were able to make a daytrip to our new home to help with unpacking–something that wouldn’t have been possible while at seminary. ¬†We’re enjoying have central A.C.¬†and a dishwasher. ¬†I met my new midwife a few days ago and I think I will be fairly comfortable under her care.

Overall, there’s nothing unexpected about this move. ¬†That is, until you take into account a¬†congregation and the giant Fourth of July celebration.

Normally I would consider Independence Day one of my favorite holidays. ¬†Since kids aren’t in school, it hasn’t gotten ridiculously commercialized. ¬†It’s one of the few major holidays that celebrating with friends¬†or family is acceptable. ¬†It’s laid back and fun.

However, this year it’s a bit of a bummer. ¬†We’re new in town, so we don’t have any friends to celebrate with (*sniff* Woe is me). ¬†Plus, our new town has an enormous 4th of July festival that draws people from all the area’s small towns. ¬†There are games, there is a parade, there are fireworks, and who knows what else. ¬†Being in a small town, it also means that the congregation members are involved with the festival. ¬†The church even has a float in the parade.

Consequently, my husband and I are in a bit of a bind. ¬†On one hand, we were told numerous times at the seminary that a good pastor (and by default, his family) is part of the community. ¬†That means doing things like attending the 4th of July celebration. ¬†On the other hand, we’ve been here a week and I’ve meet less than a dozen people in town. ¬†All I want to do today is hang our decorations while eating chocolate, not go out and mingle.

Consequently, I’ve started using the dreaded “O” word. ¬†I feel¬†obligated to attend the festival because of my husband’s position. ¬†We went to a benefit dance last night because I felt¬†obligated¬†to go since someone had purchased us tickets (the dance was a dismal social failure on our part–I’ll probably write about it in the near future). ¬†I feel¬†obligated¬†to watch¬†the parade since so many congregation members will be in it. ¬†Never mind that I don’t know them. ¬†People will ask if we attended and if we enjoyed it.

I know next year will probably be better. ¬†Next year we might even be excited about the 4th of July festival. ¬†But for right now, it’s tough to know how to balance unspoken (and, admittedly, perhaps imagined) expectations with our emotional health.

I hope you all are having a great Independence Day despite my¬†melancholy post. ¬†Just to let you know, I’ll be rolling out some changes to my blog soon. ¬†I hope you enjoy them!¬†