Conversations With My Toddler: Crucifixes vs. Crosses

Recently, Babykins has started to notice the crucifixes in our bedrooms. My husband and my bedroom has one hanging above our bed, the nursery has one hanging above the closet door. Whenever she points them out, we talk about how Jesus died on the cross to forgive our sins.

However, in the guestroom we have a decorative cross. Babykins was looking at it the other day and we then had this chat:

Babykins: What’s dat? (points to the cross)

Me: That’s a cross

Babykins: Jesus no on that one!

Me: Well, yes, um. . . That’s because it’s just a cross. When Jesus is on the cross, it’s called a crucifix. Can you say “crucifix”?

Babykins: Crucifix!

Pastor’s kids can have the oddest vocabulary.


Aftermath

Last week, my good friend and fellow pastor’s wife came to visit us with her 2 children. We also had all of the parsonage’s windows replaced during their visit because sometimes timing just works like that.

There was no chance of keeping the house tidy with 3 children under 3, a steady progression of windows coming out and in, and me gimping around with an aching back because I’m 33 weeks pregnant. I tried to pick up a little yesterday and didn’t get very far.

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But there is much to be thankful for in the chaos. Thankfulness for a dear friend who takes time from her home to come visit and thankfulness for a congregation who wants to keep their pastor’s house cozy and nice.


Advantages of Living in a Parsonage

Parsonage horror stories are passed around during the seminary years. Most of the time you don’t hear them from someone who actually experienced it. In stead, the story usually starts with, “I know of a pastor who lived in a parsonage. . .” and then goes on to tell a terrible tale about a run-down house where every congregation member had a key and the church council would hold their meetings at 5 a.m. in the parsonage’s living room.

Okay, maybe I’m exaggerating a little bit. But many of these parsonage tales convince skittish seminary families that they never, ever want to live in a parsonage.

Thankfully, many seminary families live in homes owned by the church on vicarage. Often these families come out of vicarage having a good experience in their homes. Likewise, the majority of experienced pastor’s families have mostly positive things to say about living in parsonages.

This is the second parsonage my husband and I have lived in (well, technically the house on vicarage wasn’t a parsonage because a pastor never lived there, but it was the same idea). So far we’ve had a good experience living in a parsonage for several reasons:

1. We don’t have to worry about finding housing: Moving for vicarage or a call is generally a whirlwind. With only a couple of months to pack up and move, there is very little time to find housing. If there isn’t a parsonage, either the family has to quickly buy a house with very little knowledge of the area or they have to rent a place knowing that there is another move if they decide to buy a house. Likewise, the pastor’s family doesn’t have to worry about selling a house should he accept a different call.

2. We don’t have to pay for major renovations and repairs: Since the church owns the house, they take on the responsibility of keeping it livable. Admittedly, sometimes this can be a frustration when the pastor’s family is hoping for an immediate repair or change because it takes time to get approval from the right committees. However, when something like the septic system backing up occurs, the church will cover the cost.

Sometimes the church will even pay for an improvement that you weren’t expecting. For example, the dishwasher was a bit aged when we moved into our current parsonage. My husband and I weren’t complaining because we were thrilled to have any mechanical dishwasher after hand-washing dishes for 3 years. However, our trustee decided that the dishwasher wasn’t working well enough and had it replaced. It’s the nicest dishwasher I’ve ever had in my home.

3. We can embrace our home with, “We’ll make it work.”: This may sound like a backhanded compliment, but I promise it’s not. I’m a perfectionist when it comes to shopping–that’s probably why I hate it so much. I’m always convinced that there is a product that is a little bit better quality for a little bit better price and I MUST FIND IT!! That’s why I do things like search 20 minutes on Amazon for the perfect pair of socks for Babykins (Seriously, self, it’s just a pair of socks!). Can you imagine how I would be if I had to buy a house? Be given a house is a relief to my perfectionist tendencies. Instead of searching for the nonexistent perfect house, we can look at our home and say, “There are some great things and not-so-great things. We’ll make it work!”

Credit where credit is due: My sister-in-law, who grew up in teacherages and lived in a parsonage, introduced me to this mentality. 🙂 

4. The members feel a connection to the house: Admittedly, this is a little bit harder fro me to embrace, but congregation members often like being able to care for their pastor in a tangible way. Helping with his home is an easy way for them to do this.

Of course, there are some disadvantages to living in a parsonage, but there are disadvantages to any housing situation. Overall, I would say our experiences with parsonages have been positive and I’m very thankful for the homes our congregations have provided for us.

 


The First Awkward Drop-by

Almost every pastor’s wife has a story about when a member dropped by unexpectedly at a really bad time.  We’ve only been here a month and I’ve already created my first awkward drop-by situation.

During the week, I’ve been trying really hard to make myself presentable by 9:00.  This is to give me some semblance of routine and save me the embarrassment of getting caught in my jammies at 3 in the afternoon.  Saturday mornings are a different story.  It doesn’t matter that I don’t have a job so Saturday isn’t really a day off, it doesn’t matter that my husband goes into work on Saturday morning.  I still haven’t lost the schedule that was ingrained in me since grade-school.  Saturday means relax day.  That means I don’t get dressed.

This past Saturday was no different.  It was 9:30, my husband had already left for work and I was merrily surfing the internet while still in my PJs.

To be clear, I was 30 weeks pregnant, so pajamas at this point means a pair of sweatpants that stretch over my ever-expanding belly and one of my husband’s t-shirts.  To be extra clear, my husband is over a foot taller than me, so his t-shirts are still enormous on me despite my pregnancy.  It’s not flattering, but it’s comfy.

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The doorbell rang.  I glanced down at myself.  Not presentable at all–I wasn’t even wearing proper undergarments.  However, my husband had left the regular door open when he left for work, so pretending that no one was home wasn’t an option.  Next tactic: Put on a sweatshirt to better cover myself up.  Unfortunately, I didn’t have a sweatshirt in the living room, but my husband did.  I put it on.  It looked more ridiculous than the t-shirt.  Add on my unkempt hair and glasses and I was a tousled mess.

Truth be told, I was hoping that the doorbell signaled the arrival of a package despite the fact it was Saturday.  At least then the delivery person would have dropped off the package and wouldn’t see me.  My hopes were crushed when I approached the door and realized that I congregation member was standing at the door.  Feeling like a sloppy fool, I answered the door in my pregnant, pajama-clad glory.

It turns out that the congregation member was dropping off some sweet corn for us, which was nice.  He also didn’t linger, which was also nice because  I was feeling quite flustered by that point.  I imagine it was awkward for him as well to have me answer the door while still in my PJs.

At any rate, the truth is now in the open:  Sometimes the pastor’s wife lounges around in her pajamas.  But it’s better to lower expectations sooner rather than later, right?

What is your awkward drop-by story?